fbpx
(860) 222-7171
Why My Lawn Is Brown But My Neighbor’s Looks Great: Part 2.

Why My Lawn Is Brown But My Neighbor’s Looks Great: Part 2.

   Last year we took a very shallow dive into the topic of having a brown yard, while your neighbor’s lawn is lush & green.  We talked about very basic causes of brown lawn like low improper mowing and drought.  Here we will dive deep into the pathology of brown lawns so that you can get a better understanding of what your neighbors may be doing differently. Read Part 1 of this series here: https://greenteamct.com/2018/07/16/2-big-reasons-why-your-lawn-is-brown-and-your-neighbors-isnt/   Start With Your Soil If you’ve ever noticed your neighbor probing the ground and holding small viles of murky liquid to the sun, you may be witnessing a homeowner pH test at work.  This would indicate they have found and corrected a pH imbalance in their yard that may exist still in yours.  To have a green lawn you MUST start with the soil, and the first thing to check is the pH. Poor pH is a common culprit of browning grass. Compaction is another major soil factor that kills grass.  Tightly compacted soil suffocates grassroots and drains the chlorophyll that makes grass green. In this case, you may have noticed some holes and “dog-dropping” like cores on your neighbor’s lawn in Fall.  This may be an indicator your neighbor is fighting compaction with regular aeration, thereby keeping their lawn healthier and greener than yours. Read more on lawn aeration here: https://greenteamct.com/2019/09/16/be-true-to-the-core-true-core-lawn-aeration/   Insect Pests Insect pets such as Chinch Bugs, Japanese Beetle Grubs, and Weevils cause extensive damage to lawns that show up as yellow or brown patches.  These insect pests are mostly hidden in your thatch layer and are nocturnal. ...
Pest Control Chronicles: 3 Grassy Weeds That Are Likely To Haunt Your Lawn This Summer.

Pest Control Chronicles: 3 Grassy Weeds That Are Likely To Haunt Your Lawn This Summer.

Grassy weeds in your lawn are the most difficult pests to identify and control.  For the average homeowner, telling them apart is near impossible, and getting rid of weeds like crabgrass is usually an even harder task.  Here we will talk about some common lawn killing weeds in the northeast and what you can do to control them.   CRABGRASS The most problematic of all lawn weeds, crabgrass can be more easily identified than other grassy weeds.  Crabgrass is an annual weed, which spreads from last year’s seeds.  It can be identified by its purplish-red stems near the soil, and its finger-like projections that give it its name. To control this weed you must use an aggressive pre-emergent plan that should include half-applications in Fall and then again in Spring. Read more on Crabgrass Here:https://greenteamct.com/2019/04/22/reminder-your-time-to-prevent-crabgrass-ends-soon/ Goosegrass Goosegrass is another summer annual that will emerge around the same time as Crabgrass.  The difference in appearance will be that it only grows in tufts, bunches with a single tap root, and has bleached stems that are often flattened to the ground. Seedheads will resemble a zipper-like pattern and gives it an easy way to make an identification.  Goosegrass needs to be treated like crabgrass, with an aggressive pre-emergent strategy and proper watering. Very dry and compacted soil is preferable to this weed, so keeping your soil in a healthy condition can help deter Goosegrass growth. Read about another common lawn weed here: https://greenteamct.com/spring-lawn-pest-control-spotlight-the-early-bloomer-common-chickweed     Yellow Nutsedge It is almost amazing how common this weed is in lawns, yet how overlooked it can be.  Nutsedge can blend well with preferable grasses...
Truly Bee Friendly Lawn Care Tips. How You Can Have a Nice Lawn & Protect Pollinators.

Truly Bee Friendly Lawn Care Tips. How You Can Have a Nice Lawn & Protect Pollinators.

With the recent reports of dwindling Bee populations, it is important to remember these important insects in your Eco-friendly lawn care plans.  Although, per the EPA, Colony Collapse Disorder(CCD) is reportedly mainly caused by Varroa mites, viruses, and habitat changes; every homeowner can do their part to promote a healthy pollinator population.   Pollination Friendly Plantings The over-arching issue with the Bee population decline is the role they play in the pollination of our food crops and livestock pastures.  Planting long-blooming shrubs and flowers in your landscape can help attract and promote Bees during their pollination periods. The recent Facebook fad is to promote bee pollination by leaving Dandelions to grow in your laws.  While Dandelions are great for bees because of their numerous pollen making parts, dandelions have very short life spans. How many times have you seen these yellow flowers quickly transition into the cotton-like seed heads that kids love to blow? Instead, focus on plants with long flowering cycles. Plants that produce long-lasting blooms are plentiful, here are just a few examples: Azaleas Rhododendron Daylillies Forsythia Dogwood Impatiens Roses Read more on Eco-Friendly landscaping here:https://greenteamct.com/2018/07/29/tips-advice-eco-friendly-landscaping/   Create a Shallow, Moving Water Bee Oasis Thought you knew everything about the “Birds N Bees”.  But did you know they both enjoy shallow moving water areas? That’s right, though bird baths are already a popular landscape feature, creating gentle slopes with rocks encourages bees to bath and drink.  Maintaining the “moving” detail of this tip will discourage Mosquitoes, as they require still water to lay eggs. Learn more rock landscaping tips here: https://greenteamct.com/2019/04/26/landscape-design-journals-white-rock-for-dark-spots/   Perform Mowing, Cutting, Trimming Around...
6 Common Lawn Problems and How to Fix Them

6 Common Lawn Problems and How to Fix Them

An Eroding Slope Problem: “Our beautiful backyard slope was washing down onto our patio with every rain. It was only a matter of time before the whole hill came tumbling down.” Reader Solution: “We built a dry creek bed on the slope, and it fills dramatically during a rainstorm. It’s a beautiful addition to our landscape, and it seems to be solving our erosion problem.” Carolyn Rogers Expert Input “A dry creek bed can work well to control erosion,” says landscape architect Susan Jacobson, “if there’s a place for the water to go such as a sandy area somewhere else on your property.” In its simplest form, a dry creek bed is simply a gully or trough filled with rocks that directs the flow of water to prevent erosion. To control larger volumes of water, pin landscape fabric in the gully and mortar the rocks into place. Constructing the creek bed with rocks of several different sizes gives it a natural look and maximizes its water-carrying abilities. Also: Check Out These 7 Organic Lawn Tips For You Try This Season But Jacobson says building a dry creek bed won’t work in every situation. “You’ll create a bigger problem (and a potentially illegal situation) if you direct the water into the street or into your neighbor’s yard. And if the slope is too steep, you might just end up with the rocks tumbling down the hill as well.” To control erosion on a steep slope or when there’s no reasonable place for the water to flow, consider these suggestions: Terrace the slope with boulders, stone retaining walls or landscape timbers to gradually flatten...
Pest Control Chronicles: The Hairy Chinch Bug. Identification & Control.

Pest Control Chronicles: The Hairy Chinch Bug. Identification & Control.

  Damage from many many common Lawn pests and diseases mimic each other, along with offering similarities to non-pathogenic problems such as drought and compaction.  The Hairy Chinch Bug is one of these pests that causes very generic damage to lawns during the hot season, making identification next to impossible for the untrained eye.   Identification Hairy Chinch Bugs are very small, about 1/8″, making scouting with the naked eye challenging.  Adults resemble slender black beetles with white wings and hairy body parts.  Scouting for clinch bugs in your lawn can be done using a coffee can, or similar metal container, with the bottom cut out.  Push the can about halfway into the ground, and fill with water.  Bugs should float to the top within a few minutes. Read up on another common lawn pest here: https://greenteamct.com/2019/01/08/fungal-diseases-that-can-damage-your-lawn-during-after-winter/   Damage This pest prefers dry, hot weather that persists on southernly slopes.  Also, heavy thatch build-up will provide desirable living conditions for Chinch Bugs.  The damage will appear as irregular yellowing on areas that get the most sun.  The appearance and timing of this damage can easily be confused with heat drought.   Control Cultural/Organic: Keeping thatch build-up at a minimum by regularly raking your lawn, and regular watering, will tip the balance in your favor when using non-chemical controls for Chinch Bug.  Some varieties of Rye Grass have a natural fungus that repels these and similar pests.  Lastly, there are beneficial organisms like Big Eye Bug and the Fungus Beuvaria Bassiana that are natural enemies of The Hairy Chinch. Chemical Control: Established Chinch Bug populations are well documented as incredibly difficult...