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A Guide to Reviving Your Summer-Stressed Lawn.

A Guide to Reviving Your Summer-Stressed Lawn.

Many of our clients state that their lawns always die back during Summer, and attribute this to some natural, uncontrollable phenomenon.  While the mild temperatures and high moisture of Spring & Fall can make having a beautiful lawn easy; Summer is the one time of year you must follow the common recommendations to keep your grass green and strong.  We have some graphical representations below of the most important steps you can take to revive and protect your lawn from summer drought.     Lawn Care in Connecticut Green Team provides Lawn Care to the CT shoreline and beyond.  Our experts can assess and recommend options to revive your lawn in Summer or maintain it all year.  Call us for a free assessment at (860) 222-7171 or click the button below.   SCHEDULE...
Lawn Grubs: Out of Sight Shouldn’t Mean Out of Mind.

Lawn Grubs: Out of Sight Shouldn’t Mean Out of Mind.

Grubs are some of the most damaging pests for any lawn, in almost any climate zone.  Here in the Northeast Grubs do the most damage in Summer.  Here’s some important information on the life cycle of the white grub, and how to control them as a homeowner. What Are Grubs? Grubs are the larvae of many types of beetles and other insect pests. They live underground during the Winter, then come to the surface layer of soil to feed on grassroots in Spring.  As Grubs demolish the roots of the grass, your lawn will turn brown and die back before the summer.  As they become adults, they lay eggs.  These eggs will hatch in late summer, and become root-feeding larvae gain in the Fall.   What Does Grub Damage Look Like? Grubs feed on grassroots, which turns your lawn yellow to brown, in very irregular patterns. If Grubs have invaded your lawn, you can pull on the dead turf and it will easily lift and roll back like new sod, this is because there are no roots to anchor the old sod layer. Also, you may notice holes and tunnels in your lawn from grub feeding animals, like skunks and moles.   How Can I Control Grubs? This most effective method to discourage grub invasions to focus on ridding your lawn of the adult insects that may lay eggs destined to become Grubs.  This includes the control of Japanese Beetles, Asiatic Beetles, Chafers and more. An organic option for Grub control is a bacteria known as “Milky Spore Disease”.  This a beneficial organism that has been shown to control,...
Life and Lawn Saving Facts: Lawn Tasks in the Summer Heat. Summer Lawn Maintenance Tips.

Life and Lawn Saving Facts: Lawn Tasks in the Summer Heat. Summer Lawn Maintenance Tips.

  During the hot Summer months, it is important to start assessing and calculating the risks involved with certain lawn maintenance tasks. Mowing and watering your lawn in excessive heat and humidity poses certain risks to not only your lawn, but can also prove detrimental to your personal health.  Here we discuss some risks and and changes in your lawn care approach that should be considered going into the Summer months.   Cut Back On The Watering Despite traditional wisdom on watering lawns during the summer, this is a time when less is more. The high heat and humidity creates a breeding ground for Summer lawn diseases, such as Brown Patch and Summer Patch.  Having excessive moisture on grass blades aids in development of these fungal diseases. There are also certain insect pests, such as the Japanese Beetle, that thrive better in wet versus dry conditions.  The following are some best practices for watering your lawn during Summer. Water no more than 2 times per week from July through August Heavy infrequent watering creates a thicker, more drought resistant turf Water to about 1 inch per session Do not mow a wet lawn Use shade trees and perennials to create a natural barrier against heat stress   Perform Tasks Your Lawn at Times That Are Safer For You and Your Lawn Performing lawn or landscaping tasks in the heat can be dangerous to not only your lawn, it can be dangerous to your health as well.  Cutting grass, or other plants, during high temperatures causes the whole plant to go into a state of shock.  After this, the plant...
Traditional Vs Organic Lawn Care. What is Truth or Myth?

Traditional Vs Organic Lawn Care. What is Truth or Myth?

  All Winter you have committed yourself to buy fruits and vegetables from the organic section at Big Y, and possibly even switched to homeopathic herbal remedies over some prescription medications. All this in a high-cost effort to live more “naturally”, or to reduce your carbon footprint.  Now that Spring has arrived, it’s time to consider organic options for your Lawn, and quantify their effectiveness.  But before you jump into your local Agway searching for Corn Gluten Meal and Vinegar based weed products, let’s discover some truths and myths about the two options you have available for yard maintenance. Check Out Our Related Article: https://greenteamct.com/7-organic-lawn-care-tips-to-try-this-year Myth: All Pesticides Cause Cancer Truth: In a recent lawsuit of the manufacturer of “Round-Up” weed killer, Montansanto Inc., it was discovered that there was a sufficient correlation between one farmer’s cancer diagnosis and his heavy use of the product on crops.  This case was recently overturned and the EPA has since documented that Round-Up definitively does not cause cancer. Also, this lawsuit never applied to controlled products use by licensed lawn professionals. Check Out: https://greenteamct.com/2020/05/04/u-s-epa-reaffirms-that-glyphosate-does-not-cause-cancer/   Myth: Vinegar or Baking Soda Kills Weeds as Well As Chemicals Truth: Baking Soda acts as a desiccant, which means it dries out plant parts to their death. While on the other hand, the active ingredient in Vinegar, Acetic Acid, kills plants & grasses by causing a deadly pH acid balance. These two methods are effective at killing most small weeds and some insects, when used at high concentrations, but do not offer any long term effect beyond the time of application. Additionally, these methods are non-selective...