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Time To Lime. How Lime Will Help #SaveYourGreen

Time To Lime. How Lime Will Help #SaveYourGreen

Welcome back spring, and welcome to all you fans of lush lawns, lovely landscapes and glorious gardens!     The Green Team would like to remind you all that with spring’s arrival it is once again, TIME TO LIME! Your lawn is a living thing and it needs the same attention and care that you would provide to your furry friends or house plants.     Our lawns require a delicate pH balance. It’s a tricky business that is half science and half art. Bringing your lawn back to life or keeping it on track to captivate the neighborhood all summer can be done with a little TLC. In this case, “That Lime Care”.If you’re noticing brown out patches and grass that seems less than vibrant, a big problem can be the pH imbalance in your soil. The Green Team can identify the issue, cultivate a plan and calibrate your lawn so that the balance is restored.     Many homeowners and lovers of green spaces think that adding lime to their yard will be an easy task, but be forewarned! Adding lime to sufficiently alkaline lawns can burn out swaths of your yard. Not adding enough can leave acid levels too high and deliver less than desired results, leaving your yard struggling for survival. If you are considering attempting this task by your own hand make sure to test you soils properly first. Understanding what your lawn needs is paramount. Lime itself will not be enough to deliver a Home & Garden level lawn; a proper plan for fertilization is crucial. If this seems a daunting task then...
How to Get Rid of and Prevent Moss in Your Lawn. Organically.

How to Get Rid of and Prevent Moss in Your Lawn. Organically.

Many homeowners trying to get rid of moss in the lawn fail to realize that moss plants are an indicator that you currently have less than ideal conditions for growing grass. So this weed is not the cause of your problems, but an effect. The potential causes behind the problem are: Low soil pH Lack of necessary nutrients in the soil Poor drainage Excessive shade Consequently, you have to understand that the job of getting rid of moss (permanently) has only just begun when you remove the particular patch of moss growing in your lawn at the present time. You must follow up that initial removal with some investigative work, to determine why moss would grow in the area to begin with, in spite of your attempts to grow grass there. If you fail to discover which of the potential causes behind the problem applies to your own lawn, a new patch of moss will simply take the place of the old one. Firing the Initial Salvo How do you get rid of the moss currently growing in the lawn? Well, since moss is shallow-rooted, you may be able simply to rake it out. But if you do need to apply an herbicide, take note that there are both chemical and organic options. Among the latter, baking soda is sometimes used, as well as soap (both Safer soap and the type of soap you use to wash dishes). For example, some people recommend filling a garden sprayer with 2 gallons of lukewarm water and mixing in a box of baking soda. Others mix dish soap (Dawn Ultra seems to be the preferred product) and water in...
6 Common Lawn Problems and How to Fix Them

6 Common Lawn Problems and How to Fix Them

An Eroding Slope Problem: “Our beautiful backyard slope was washing down onto our patio with every rain. It was only a matter of time before the whole hill came tumbling down.” Reader Solution: “We built a dry creek bed on the slope, and it fills dramatically during a rainstorm. It’s a beautiful addition to our landscape, and it seems to be solving our erosion problem.” Carolyn Rogers Expert Input “A dry creek bed can work well to control erosion,” says landscape architect Susan Jacobson, “if there’s a place for the water to go such as a sandy area somewhere else on your property.” In its simplest form, a dry creek bed is simply a gully or trough filled with rocks that directs the flow of water to prevent erosion. To control larger volumes of water, pin landscape fabric in the gully and mortar the rocks into place. Constructing the creek bed with rocks of several different sizes gives it a natural look and maximizes its water-carrying abilities. Also: Check Out These 7 Organic Lawn Tips For You Try This Season But Jacobson says building a dry creek bed won’t work in every situation. “You’ll create a bigger problem (and a potentially illegal situation) if you direct the water into the street or into your neighbor’s yard. And if the slope is too steep, you might just end up with the rocks tumbling down the hill as well.” To control erosion on a steep slope or when there’s no reasonable place for the water to flow, consider these suggestions: Terrace the slope with boulders, stone retaining walls or landscape timbers to gradually flatten...
Everything You Need To Know to Know About Mulch

Everything You Need To Know to Know About Mulch

  Improve your gardens and reduce the work! Mulch is good for your plants and a great labor saver. It reduces evaporation, slows weed growth, improves soil quality, and makes your gardens look more attractive. And more, it’s inexpensive and easy to apply.   Why use mulch? Common types of mulch colors: mulch vs bark Wood chips and bark are the most common types of mulch colors, but you can even use stones to good effect. In most cases, a mulch backyard greatly simplifies your gardening chores. Mulch includes a variety of materials that you use to cover the bare soil in your gardens. Most often you think of it as organic materials such as wood chips, cedar bark mulch, and compost, but it also includes materials like stone and gravel. Adding a layer of mulch pays off by: Reducing water loss from the soil. It slows evaporation and improves water absorption when it rains or you turn on the sprinkler. Slowing weed growth. Improving soil quality. Organic types enrich the soil as they decompose. Protecting plant roots from hot and cold temperature extremes and sudden fluctuations. Adding color and texture as part of your overall garden design. Whether you’re an ardent gardener or a casual one, you’ll have less watering, weeding, fertilizing and general maintenance. What type of mulch should I use? Organic mulch Use organic mulches when possible, because they decompose and improve the soil as they break down. You’ll find a variety of mulches at your local nursery. But no one type of mulch does it all. Use an aged organic mulch (partially decomposed wood products) to...
How Long Does it Take for Grass Seed to Grow?

How Long Does it Take for Grass Seed to Grow?

There’s no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to planting grass seed. There are different rules to follow whether you’re seeding for the first time or reseeding problem areas of your lawn. So how long does it take for grass seed to grow? Well, that depends on where you live and the type of grass you’re trying to grow. It also depends on some factors out of your control, such as sunlight, ground temperature and moisture. From Seed to Plant In general, it takes between seven and 30 days for a plant to grow from a seed, according to Lawn Love, a lawn service company with locations throughout the U.S. For example, if you’re trying to plant fescue grass, expect a germination period of seven to 14 days. However, it may take Kentucky bluegrass 14 to 30 days to germinate. “It’s important to note that not all the seeds will sprout at the exact same time. But, if you’ve been waiting a sufficient amount of time and the area you seeded isn’t showing signs of life, then you may have to take a look at the factors that may have caused germination to fail before you try again,” according to the Lawn Love website. Addressing Problems Two main reasons grass seed isn’t growing is cool and wet weather, according to Jonathan Green, a leading supplier of grass seed. “Grass seed that is planted in soil temperatures below 50 degrees just will not grow potentially for many weeks if it does not want to,” according to the website. “Usually for the soil temperature to reach 50 degrees you need seven to 10 days...